S is for Mt. Snaefell

I had to giggle – just a little bit – when I first learned about Mt. Snaefell (see this map for location). When I looked at photographs of the mountain I scratched my head and thought, “That’s not a mountain…it’s a big hill.” I live near the Rocky Mountains and am used to the high peaks here (12,000-14,000 feet). The joke’s on me because it really is classified as a mountain; it stands tall at 2,037 feet.

There are a couple of ways to get to the top, and when I go to Isle of Man I will be taking the foot trail up. There is also the Snaefell Mountain Railway that takes passengers all the way to the summit. After working up a hunger from the hike, there is a cafe at the top. I’ve heard that taking a packed bit of food is a nice way to go as well. Dress appropriately. I’m told the summit is usually windy and cool. You could get snow, or rain, or both.

You might actually experience the summit on a clear, bright day! There is a well-known saying in the Isle of Man that on a clear day six kingdoms can be seen from the top: the Isle of Man, England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales and Heaven.

In the summer of 1883 William Wordsworth toured Scotland. During this trip he went to Isle of Man and wrote a series of sonnets about his trip. Included is one from his stop on the island a snippet for Mt. Snaefell:


TYNWALD HILL
“Once on the top of Tynwal’s formal mound
(Still marked with green turf circles narrowing
Stage above stage) would sit this Island’s King,
The laws to promulgate, enrobed and crowned;
While compassing the little mount around,
Degrees and Orders stood, each under each;
Now, like to things within fate’s easiest reach,
The power is merged, the pomp a grave has found.
Off with yon cloud, old Snaefell ! that thine eye
Over three Rhealms may take its widest range;
And let, for them, thy fountains utter strange
Voices, they winds break forth in prophecy,
If the whole State must suffer mortal change,
Like Mona’s miniature sovereignty.

If you go to Mt. Snaefell, I hope you drop me a note and tell me about your adventure there. Maybe we’ll get lucky and bump into each other at the summit.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

This post inspired by – S

T is for Tourist Trophy

3 thoughts on “S is for Mt. Snaefell

  1. I like the idea of being able to see the six kingdoms.
    Perhaps my 5th great grandfather was climbing the Mount when he was exploring the island in January 1761 and missed the ship that was supposed to take him away.
    I think there is enormous pleasure in planning a trip as well as taking it. Will you revisit this blog and tell us about your experiences? Hoping you get a clear day and can see 6 kingdoms that day.
    Regards
    Anne from Australia
    Fellow A to Z-er
    https://ayfamilyhistory.com/2018/04/21/s-is-for-suky/

    Like

    • I’d like to imagine that he did climb Snaefell. It certainly would be a good reason to miss a ship (well, maybe not “literally” good, but you know what I mean).

      Yes, I will be posting my trip on the blog. I hope to go either 2019 or 2020.

      Liked by 1 person

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